Is It A Speech or A Presentation? – Part 3

In Part 1, I talked about the differences between those two formats whereas in Part 2, I discussed speechwriting and how the format is identical for both. While there are many similarities in the delivery of both the speech and the presentation, there is one important difference:

oSpeeches are read; presentations are spoken; and, neither should be memorized.

Those who are good at reading a speech don’t sound like they are reading a speech. They sound like they are talking to their audience which is only possible if the speaker has practiced the material out loud many times. Reading it over in your mind is not practice because you will discover, in some cases, that while the flow of words to the eye may work, those same words to the mouth do not.

If you know your material, you will then be able to acknowledge your audience as you speak, looking up and making eye contact with your listeners throughout your delivery. Knowing your material also allows for more expression in your delivery because it will allow you to talk to your audience and not at them. If your eyes are glued to your script, there is little likelihood of a dynamic delivery.

oAlways practice your material out loud, be it for the speech or the presentation. It is the only way to truly know your material.

When it comes to the presentation, learn to ‘talk it through.’ A presentation should be very conversational: it should not be rote nor sing-song. Remember those major points from Part 2? A good presenter speaks ‘around’ each of those points and subpoints. In that sense, I have never written out a presentation word for word. My presentations are always in outline form except for my openings and my closings, both of which I will memorize. [I know, I told you earlier that memorization is a no-no. And it is, except for your openings and closings! An occasional mistake in a presentation is not a problem; however, you don't want to make a mistake in your opening statement nor in your closing. Your sense of well-being - your confidence - will be greater if you can get through them both flawlessly.]

Because my presentations are in outline form, I list a few words on 5 x 8 note cards and speak ‘around’ those subpoints or sub-subpoints. For example, if I’m talking about voice improvement, my one note card will have on it two words: Jack Burghardt. Former Canadian television anchorman and Member of Parliament, the late Jack Burghardt was blessed with a wonderfully resonant speaking voice. When I later met his son, I immediately recognized the young man as a Burghardt because he sounded so much like his father which leads me then to talk about why we sound the way we do. So those two words give me a good 4-5 minutes of material.

From presentation to presentation, no matter how many times I talk about Jack, it never sounds exactly the same and the words are never the same because I’m talking ‘around’ Jack and not reading about Jack; however, as with the speech, I’m making eye contact with my audience and again I’m talking to them, not at them.

o The value of the speech lies in its exactness of its words; the value of the presentation lies in its inexactness of its words.

Whether you’re giving a speech or a presentation, talk to your audience just as if you were having a conversation in your living room. The best in the business do this and much of their success is built on a powerful, dynamic delivery in which they acknowledge their audience, they speak with expression, and they know their material.

Tabletop Easel – Excellent For Art Classes Or Presentations

A tabletop easel is the perfect companion to a business presentation for a stockholders meeting in which the state of the economy is going to be discussed and graphs and charts would help convey the magnitude of the problems the company may be facing or the importance of the solutions the presenter has arisen at and is now wanting to convey to the board of directors. Visuals are important and when everyone is sitting down, including the presenter and the information is also at a level with the audience then people are more receptive to it.

Art classes, for both young and older students would benefit from a tabletop easel to hold their drawing paper. Art classes are typically longer than an hour and no one wants to stand that long when they are creating something unique.Children may need to stand in order to reach the very top of the easel, however for the most part a table top easel works for them as well.

Tabletop Easel by KidKraft
This is a child’s tabletop easel that is made of sturdy natural wood and sits 20 inches high with a width of 14.5 inches. One side is for painting and dry erase creations with a large wooden clip to hold papers, while the flip side is a caulk board for caulk doodling. There is a generous tray at the bottom for holding large cups of paint, water, markers, caulk or pens. This folds for easy storage, transportation and carrying.

American Easel Wahkeena
This made of a natural finish fir and stands 18.5 inches tall in a triangular shape with an adjustable ‘back leg’ it is perfect for holding a canvas for painting or book to display for story time. There are four different angled settings on this ‘tripod’ shaped tabletop easel and the tray is the length of the bottom of the easel at 17 inches. The entire unit, which comes full assembled, folds flat for easy transportation, storage and carrying.

Post-it Note® Super Sticky 20″x23″ Tabletop Easel
This is the largest Post-it Note® ever made! A tabletop easel size Post-it Note® which could be used to write formulas, math problems, sentences or just about anything for schools and or businesses so that they can be displayed to everyone at the table and then tore off the easel and posted to a large dry erase board, wall or high traffic area such as the break room where everyone will see them. This is a great tool for planning, brainstorming, creating storylines for a book or play.

Best-Rite Tabletop Flannel easel
This portable, flannel covered tabletop easel is prefect for small children who like to work with letters, numbers or other cutouts, perhaps playing school against a black background on this aluminum framed tabletop easel. It measures 36″W x 24″H and the aluminum legs snap on and off for easy storage or transportation. This board could also be used by adults as a ‘greater board’ at a fundraiser or buffet of all kinds.

Father’s Day – Finding The Perfect Present For Your Dad

Choosing the ideal Father’s Day present is not an easy task for most of us – if you’re anything like me, you’ll want to get something personal, something that he’ll use and remember that you bought for him – and most of all, something that isn’t socks or aftershave! Not easy, huh?

Looking at it from his point of view – it can’t be much fun getting the same kind of presents each year. But at the end of the day, all he really wants is to know that you’ve thought about what he’d like and made an effort to find a gift that he’ll appreciate.

As we all know, a good place to start is with his hobbies – but here is where it can get more interesting… Rather than buying new golf club covers (only if he’s into golf!) or some other small item that relates to his hobby – why not try this…

Find a photo in the archives of your computer that you know he has always liked – either of family, dog, garden or of him doing whatever he likes best. A good idea, if you can find one, is of him and you together.

Now there are loads of ways you can give that picture as a gift. You could print it out with a message on it, then frame it. If you can print to A4 and smaller, try to make it fit a small picture frame which could stand on his desk to remind him of all the good times you have together. If you can print bigger – a wall hanging frame might be more appropriate. Frames can be picked up in markets or small shops quite cheaply if you shop around. In either case you might consider decorating the frame with beads, string or other craft materials for a unique gift.

If he’s into computers or his mobile phone you could add your photo to his, as wallpaper. Make sure you get up early on Father’s Day to do it. But do make sure you know what you’re doing. Messing up his computer or his phone will not be an ideal way to start Father’s Day!

Another way to make that photo into a gift is to mount it on card so that it stands out as a 3D effect. The simplest way to do this is to print your photo onto photo quality paper or card. Use double sided sticky pads to mount it on another piece of card. You can decorate around the photo by sticking on pictures of other family members or some of the places he’s visited or things he’s interested in. If you’re feeling very creative, you could print your picture more than once. Then cut out smaller detail from the picture and mount them on top of the first photo to create a decoupage effect.

The important thing to remember is that it doesn’t have to be perfect – it just has to show that you care about him enough to make the effort to make something just for him.

Of course if you are really stuck – telling him you love him and giving him a hug is probably the best present in the world for any Dad on Father’s Day!