Is It A Speech or A Presentation? – Part 3

In Part 1, I talked about the differences between those two formats whereas in Part 2, I discussed speechwriting and how the format is identical for both. While there are many similarities in the delivery of both the speech and the presentation, there is one important difference:

oSpeeches are read; presentations are spoken; and, neither should be memorized.

Those who are good at reading a speech don’t sound like they are reading a speech. They sound like they are talking to their audience which is only possible if the speaker has practiced the material out loud many times. Reading it over in your mind is not practice because you will discover, in some cases, that while the flow of words to the eye may work, those same words to the mouth do not.

If you know your material, you will then be able to acknowledge your audience as you speak, looking up and making eye contact with your listeners throughout your delivery. Knowing your material also allows for more expression in your delivery because it will allow you to talk to your audience and not at them. If your eyes are glued to your script, there is little likelihood of a dynamic delivery.

oAlways practice your material out loud, be it for the speech or the presentation. It is the only way to truly know your material.

When it comes to the presentation, learn to ‘talk it through.’ A presentation should be very conversational: it should not be rote nor sing-song. Remember those major points from Part 2? A good presenter speaks ‘around’ each of those points and subpoints. In that sense, I have never written out a presentation word for word. My presentations are always in outline form except for my openings and my closings, both of which I will memorize. [I know, I told you earlier that memorization is a no-no. And it is, except for your openings and closings! An occasional mistake in a presentation is not a problem; however, you don't want to make a mistake in your opening statement nor in your closing. Your sense of well-being - your confidence - will be greater if you can get through them both flawlessly.]

Because my presentations are in outline form, I list a few words on 5 x 8 note cards and speak ‘around’ those subpoints or sub-subpoints. For example, if I’m talking about voice improvement, my one note card will have on it two words: Jack Burghardt. Former Canadian television anchorman and Member of Parliament, the late Jack Burghardt was blessed with a wonderfully resonant speaking voice. When I later met his son, I immediately recognized the young man as a Burghardt because he sounded so much like his father which leads me then to talk about why we sound the way we do. So those two words give me a good 4-5 minutes of material.

From presentation to presentation, no matter how many times I talk about Jack, it never sounds exactly the same and the words are never the same because I’m talking ‘around’ Jack and not reading about Jack; however, as with the speech, I’m making eye contact with my audience and again I’m talking to them, not at them.

o The value of the speech lies in its exactness of its words; the value of the presentation lies in its inexactness of its words.

Whether you’re giving a speech or a presentation, talk to your audience just as if you were having a conversation in your living room. The best in the business do this and much of their success is built on a powerful, dynamic delivery in which they acknowledge their audience, they speak with expression, and they know their material.

Birthday Present Budgeting

Budgeting for Birthday Gifts

How much should you spend on birthday gifts? You could look at some of the surveys that are done to see what is the average spend on a birthday present, but you shouldn’t use this as a guide. Set and stick to a budget you’re happy with.

If you’re feeling generous then you’ll be able to spend more, and if you’re on a tight budget spend less. There’s ways of economising on presents so every birthday you celebrate can be fun!

If you’re on a small budget sometimes you can make it go further by buying several small items. This works well for children for whom there’s a lot of excitement in opening the present itself. For older children and adults this might not always work well. A subtle hint given the week before though will soften the blow for most people when you’ve got to stick to a very tight budget.

Buy the cheapest wrapping paper possible. Some people spend a fortune on ribbons and bows, and posh gift boxes. Buy cheap wrapping paper in bulk and use it for all your gift wrapping. Buy gift wrap that will be good for boys and girls, adults, birthdays and then Christmas too. Big rolls of cheap paper are a great budget saver. Buy cards in bulk too. Some shops on the high street have bargains where you can get several birthday cards for a pound! This makes them excellent value and if you keep them in a folder or drawer you’ll always have a card for that unexpected birthday too!

By ensuring the vast majority of the money is spent on the present and not the wrapping you get a much better balance.

To find innovative gifts on a budget you could look at making something yourself. A hand crafted gift can be a wonderful idea, especially if you have a skill like knitting or painting. Something personal can make a present so much more special. A hand-made gift might take a while to make though, so remember to start well in advance of the birthday!

“How To Use Microexpressions To Negotiate Better” – Negotiation Tip of the Week

Are you aware that you can see the thoughts of other people? It’s not a magic trick. It’s accomplished by observing microexpressions. Microexpressions are displays of emotion. They last for less than a second. They occur before the brain has a chance to alter the displayed emotion. Thus, the display is a genuine reaction to the stimulus that caused the emotion to be displayed.

There are seven microexpressions that are generic to everyone on the planet. That means if a stimulus occurred to someone in Europe or Asia, or anywhere in the world, the reaction would be the same.

This article identifies the seven microexpressions and how their recognition can be used in a negotiation.

Fear – Why do we become frightened? In part, it’s a way we protect ourselves. But fear can be debilitating too. In a negotiation, accurately detecting fear will give you an advantage. To obtain that advantage, you must know what the other negotiator is fearful of.

When detecting genuine fear, look for raised eyebrows, widened eyes, and parted lips with the bottom lip protruding downward.

Anger – People become upset in degrees. When it reaches a point of nontolerance, that’s when it becomes anger.

When negotiating, always be mindful of the other negotiator’s temperament, as well as your own. In both cases, when one loses one’s cool, that person can become irrational. Manipulation can easily occur at that time. Thus, they’re opportunities contained in such a mindset if you know how to advantage your position.

There are two main differences between the displayed microexpressions of fear and anger. With fear, eyebrows are raised and they’re lowered when displaying anger. In addition, with anger, one’s nostrils will flare like what a bull might exhibit prior to charging.

Disgust – In a negotiation, this is a temperament that we see when someone is not in agreement with our statement, offer or counteroffer. The other negotiator may say yes to the offer. But if he has his upper lip lifted and his nose turned up in a wrinkle while doing so, he just displayed the microexpression denoting disgust. It’s important to note the distinction between his words and actions because his statement of agreement is not as firm as his body language is indicating.

Surprise – Expressions of surprise can be good or bad (e.g. That’s better than I thought, or there’s no way I’d go for that.) You can recognize surprise by raised eyebrows, wide eyes, and a mouth that’s agape. Fear and surprise have these characteristics in common.

When negotiating, note if the expression of surprise stems from happy or sad expectations. If the other negotiator is too happy about an offer you’ve extended, you might consider reducing it.

Contempt – This gesture is conveyed by a sneer with one corner of the mouth turned upward. The meaning is, “I’m not enamored with this – I might think it’s insulting.’

Take note when you observe this gesture because it can lead to disgust and then anger.

Sadness – When sadness is displayed it’s done through drooping eyelids, lips turned down, and a change in the voice’s inflection and tonality.

If a negotiator displays sadness, it may stem from him realizing that you have the upper hand and there’s no negotiation wiggle room. If that’s a reality, don’t beat him up. You don’t want to turn that into anger, which might lead to unimagined responses.

Happiness – You’ll see this in the form of wide-eyes, a smile, raised cheeks, and a degree of exhibited gaiety.

When perceiving happiness, note what caused it but don’t let your guard down. If it’s genuine, you’ll sense an easy flow in the negotiation. If contrived, it may be an attempt to lull you into a false sense of security.

Negotiators look for advantages in every negotiation. Being able to accurately detect microexpressions can be the advantage you need. So, if you want greater advantages during your negotiations, look for the advantages that microexpressions offer. You’ll be a greater negotiator with greater outcomes… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!